'Mindball' reviewed as mimicking future telekenesis

Telekinesis is defined as the paranormal ability of the mind to influence matter without the use of any currently known type of physical energy; the 'Mindball' game purports to measure brain waves and use that energy to move a ball across a table.

Mindball isn't real telekinesis, though it appears as such, because a sliding magnet under the table picks up signals from electrodes worn as a headband, and makes the ball move.

We are getting closer to Yoda and Luke's mental lifting up his spaceship out of the swamp.

The difference is that Mindball uses physical energy, whereas Luke used mental (psychic ... paranormal) energy.

Or is there a difference?

Another interesting feature of Mindball is that it picks up on "the low-frequency components known as alpha and theta waves." Thus, the more relaxed the player, the better the game.

Yoga, meditation, acupuncture, and other relaxation or relaxing CAM therapies theoretically should help enhance focus, concentration, and ability.

Apparently the army was interested in a prototype of the game as a means to develop calm alertness among its recruits.

___________
Law Offices of Michael H. Cohen offers general corporate legal services, litigation consultation, and expertise in health law with a unique focus on alternative, complementary, and integrative medical therapies.

Michael H. Cohen is Principal in Law Offices of Michael H. Cohen and also President of the Institute for Integrative and Energy Medicine (also known as the Institute for Health, Ethics, Law, Policy & Society), a reliable forum for exploration of legal, regulatory, ethical, and health policy issues involved in the judicious integration of complementary and alternative medical therapies (such as acupuncture and traditional oriental medicine, chiropractic, massage therapy, herbal medicine) and conventional clinical care. The most recent published book by Michael H. Cohen on health care law, regulation, ethics and policy pertaining to complementary, alternative and integrative medicine and related fields is Healing at the Borderland of Medicine and Religion. This is the fourth book in a series, following Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Legal Boundaries and Regulatory Perspectives (1998), Beyond Complementary Medicine: Legal and Ethical Perspectives on Health Care and Human Evolution (2000), and Future Medicine: Ethical Dilemmas, Regulatory Challenges, and Therapeutic Pathways to Health Care and Healing in Human Transformation (2003).
___________