CAMLAW: Complementary and Alternative Medicine Law Blog

Lower your blood pressure through meditation

Meditate, walk your dog, and lower your blood pressure, studies show.

Let's do natural medicine, "when I take you out in my surrey with the fringe on top" - from Surrey:

As Surrey’s population increases and the traditional health care system faces more demands, the role of alternative and complementary medicine is growing significantly.

The number of and accreditation standards of naturopaths, acupuncturists, chiropractors, reflexologists and other such practitioners have increased dramatically as more people turn to them for help.

However, these health professionals often struggle with credibility issues.

Dr. Mark Prii runs the South Point Chiropractic office in South Surrey. He has been in practice for 20 years, and moved to Surrey four years ago from Toronto.

Prii says the public largely isn’t aware of the rigourous training and certification processes chiropractors go through, and many patients view chiropractic work as a quick-fix remedy rather than a preventative measure.

“The general public knows we treat lower back and neck pain, but we generally look throughout the spine for any irritation,” Prii says.

But Prii says chiropractic techniques can be beneficial for everything from headaches to knee pain to arthritis.

Like chiropractors, the number of naturopathic physicians has increased significantly over the last few decades.

Dr. Navi Badesha runs the Newton Naturopathic Clinic, which opened in 2005. He says very few people came to see him at first.

No surprise, CAM is criticized again for slipping through the cracks:

If you look at the courses on offer, though, you will see not only the medical and scientific ones, but also some that provide qualifications in Complementary and Alternative Medicine, CAM for short. These often stress words like holistic, energy-based, non-invasive, and integrative, and claim to provide forms of medical care not addressed by conventional medicine. The institutions offering such qualifications now include many mainstream universities.

One would think, since mainstream universities are validating these courses, that there is some serious established basis for their contents, that they were determined to be factual and meet a high intellectual standard, that the skills imparted are genuine, evidence-based, and reliable. That's what you would expect if you went to university to study say, engineering, or chemistry, or architecture. Your qualification from a university would indicate that you had met certain demanding academic and professional standards, and that the courses you had studied were rigorously assessed as to the factual basis of their content.  Unfortunately, we can no longer assume that is the case.

As the CAM movement sought mainstream acceptance, it generated its own institutions, produced its own teaching materials, issued its own qualifications, published its own journals, produced its own trainers and lecturers, and largely side-stepped the usual arbiters of academic and professional competence. Alongside the traditional academic institutions – the universities – there arose many different colleges offering qualifications in everything from crystal healing to Ayurvedic medicine, from homeopathy to light therapy, from reiki to magnets, and they operate with very different standards.

Some universities in the UK have, until recently, been issuing Bachelor of Science degrees in homeopathy alongside degrees in physics and biochemistry. Although there are strict scientific criteria for the inclusion of subjects into university academic curricula, the CAM courses slipped through the net. Those homeopathy B.Sc. courses have now been closed down – it's difficult to award a science degree based on a non-science for which there is absolutely no evidence. Nevertheless, there remain many pseudoscience courses mixed in with genuine science courses. Some universities are rebranding these pseudoscience courses as arts degrees, to avoid scientific scrutiny, and are issuing B.A. degrees instead.

Lower your blood pressure through meditation:

Meditation is no longer just for the groovy folk. A just published study in the American Journal of Hypertension suggests the practice may bring cardiovascular and mental-health benefits. The research, conducted at American University in Washington, followed 298 students, half of whom practiced transcendental meditation for 20 minutes once or twice daily over three months and half of whom did not. Results: A subgroup of subjects in the meditation group who were at increased risk for hypertension significantly lowered their blood pressure and psychological distress and also bolstered their coping ability. The average reduction in blood pressure in this group—a 6.3-mm Hg decrease in the top (systolic) number of a blood pressure reading and a 4-mm Hg decrease in the lower (diastolic) number, compared with the control group—was associated with a 52 percent reduction in the risk of developing hypertension in the future. Meditators who were not at increased risk for hypertension saw a reduction in psychological distress, depression, and anxiety as well as increased coping ability but no significant lowering of blood pressure. The results are particularly meaningful at a time when "improvement in mental health is of great concern as greater numbers of college students are being treated for anxiety and depression than ever before," says lead study author, Sanford Nidich, professor of physiology and health at the Institute for Natural Medicine and Prevention at Maharishi University of Management in Iowa.

Here is your basic CAM primer, or at least part of it:

Complementary Medicine is the use of natural therapy and medicines to restore and maintain health in addition to conventional medicine. Dating back to 420 BC, around the time of Hippocrates, complementary medicine is also considered a practice beyond the realm of conventional modern medicine - naturopathy, chiropractic, Ayurvedic, homeopathy, acupuncture and so many other complementary medicine treatments are steadily in demand and on the rise.

Because our bodies are composed of chemical and physical reactions, holistic practitioners affirm that illness is not directly caused by pathogens such as viruses or bacterium; instead is the consequence of the body's reaction (in an effort to shield and heal itself) to a pathogen. Naturopathic and holistic doctors assist potential clients through complementary medicine by plainly alleviating symptoms of disease. Complementary medicine can treat most conditions like headaches, sore throats, flu and cold, indigestion, ear infections, dermatitis, urinary tract infections, sprains and strains. Some chronic conditions such as migraines, autoimmune disorders, cardiovascular disease, arthritis, cancer, muscle-skeletal pain, depression, stress, and even pregnancy and childbirth may be treated with complementary medicine as well.

Complementary medicine teaches proper nutrition in conjunction with vitamin and mineral supplements. Plants and herbs are commonly used in alternative medicine to treat illness, as well as remedies produced from animals and minerals. Hydrotherapy and hypnotherapy are also utilized in complmentary medicine for maximum benefits. All in all, complementary medicine improves mental, emotional, and physical health. It encourages psychic and spiritual growth, and an overwhelming sense of wellness.

You can read more about complementary medicine here at Holistic Junction where you will find a broad spectrum of complementary medicine articles, information and complementary medicine directories.

Complementary Medicine is the use of natural therapy and medicines to restore and maintain health in addition to conventional medicine. Dating back to 420 BC, around the time of Hippocrates, complementary medicine is also considered a practice beyond the realm of conventional modern medicine - naturopathy, chiropractic, Ayurvedic, homeopathy, acupuncture and so many other complementary medicine treatments are steadily in demand and on the rise.

Because our bodies are composed of chemical and physical reactions, holistic practitioners affirm that illness is not directly caused by pathogens such as viruses or bacterium; instead is the consequence of the body's reaction (in an effort to shield and heal itself) to a pathogen. Naturopathic and holistic doctors assist potential clients through complementary medicine by plainly alleviating symptoms of disease. Complementary medicine can treat most conditions like headaches, sore throats, flu and cold, indigestion, ear infections, dermatitis, urinary tract infections, sprains and strains. Some chronic conditions such as migraines, autoimmune disorders, cardiovascular disease, arthritis, cancer, muscle-skeletal pain, depression, stress, and even pregnancy and childbirth may be treated with complementary medicine as well.
 

 


Michael H CohenMichael H Cohen
Founder
The Los Angeles / San Francisco / Bay Area-based Michael H Cohen Law Group provides healthcare legal and FDA legal & regulatory counsel to health & wellness practices and ventures, including health technology companies (medical devices to wearable health and nanotech), healthcare facilities (from medical centers to medical spas), and healthcare service providers (from physicians to psychologists).Our legal team offers expertise in corporate & transactional, healthcare regulatory & compliance, and healthcare litigation and dispute resolution, in cutting-edge areas such as anti-aging and functional medicine, telemedicine and m-health, and concierge medicine.Our Founder, attorney Michael H. Cohen, is an author, speaker on healthcare law and FDA law, and internationally-recognized thought leader in the trillion-dollar health & wellness industry.
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COMPLEMENTARY & ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE LAW BLOG

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