Personalized Medicine Changing Health Care

Personalized medical services will become part of integrative medicine, partly bridging the gap between conventional and complementary therapies.

Many CAM therapies stem from a perspective of treating the 'whole person' as an individual, and pick up on the critique of biomedicine as mechanistic, reductionist, and focused on general theory rather than attending to individual variations.

But the medicine of the future will look different, emphasizing individuality and tailoring both diagnosis and treatment to the person.

National Geographic reports in "Personalized Medicine Promises Tailor-Made Diagnoses, Treatments" that genomic sequencing prior to a doctor's visit will become routine, and that with personalized medicine, "Using information from the test, your physician not only diagnoses the diseases you are most susceptible to but also selects the types and doses of medication best suited to help you combat the maladies."

The report quotes DNA-maven Francis Collins as follows:

"'When you go to your physician ten years from now virtually all of the decisions about diagnosis and treatment will be based on individual information about your particular circumstance as opposed to a more general kind of approach to lots of other people in your general circumstance.'"

Nutritional genomics would be one example of using personalized medicine.

The integrative medicine research of the future may need to utilize genomic data to try to understand the personalized emphasis of CAM therapies, modalities and systems such as Ayurveda, traditional oriental herbal medicine, and Tibetan medicine.