Qigong for cancer care

Health trends include qigong for cancer care with a video by MD Anderson.

A practitioner of qigong therapy reports that the USM (Universiti Sains Malaysia) department of Nuclear Medicine, Radiotherapy and Oncology will host a seminar on Integrative Oncology on August 20 and 21 in Kota Bharu, Kelantan. The seminar will explore, among other things, the holistic approach to cancer therapy and the integration of medical and non-medical/CAM (complementary/alternative medicine) treatment modalities.

While most qigong exercises for cancer require the patients to recharge the healing qi by themselves, which will take time, in qigong cancer therapy, the master attempts to help the patient by "jumpstarting" the healing process with high doses of his own qi.

In the process, he also unblocks the flow of stagnated qi (which is bound to exist in an unhealthy person) and also removes the bad or toxic qi as well.

The patient then continues with her own practice to build-up the healing qi further. The more often qigong healing is done, and the more often the patient does her own practice, the faster will be the recovery.

Although qigong masters can also channel the universal qi to the patient, just as in Reiki and other energy-healing methods, the healing effect is much slower compared to healing with the masters' own internal qi, which is condensed and focused before being transferred to the patient. For patients with advanced cancer, time is short and intensive therapy sessions are required.

The author of this founded a therapy called SuperQigong.

On the same topic, MD Anderson Cancer Center features a video on qigong (chigong), noting:

The slow, gentle movements and meditative, breathing exercises of qigong can help cancer patients relax to lower their stress levels and help them tolerate treatment, experts say.

Qigong (pronounced "chee gung" or "chee koong") is an ancient Chinese practice designed to direct energy within the body to improve health. Michael Powers teaches qigong at M. D. Anderson's Place ... of wellness, part of the cancer center's Integrative Medicine Program.

Yet another commercial site is offering alternative medicine information to subscribers:

Alternative medicine is growing in popularity to treat medical conditions ranging from allergies to chronic pain, but consumers are often buffeted by contradictory opinions and half-baked claims.

A new Web site, rVita, hopes to use a scientific scalpel to separate the tried-and-true therapies from the unproven remedies that have no clinical evidence to back up their far-fetched claims.

The start-up, which launched its beta version in May, has three competitive advantages: top-notch medical expertise, an experienced executive team and backing from seasoned entrepreneurs who have been steeled by the vagaries of up and down markets.

Here is an unusual talk for those interested in the interface of biotech and CAM:

11 a.m. - Bent Creek Institute and the Vision for a New Natural & Integrative Medicine Economy in WNC.

Jeff Schmitt will highlight Bent Creek Institute, a research facility that develops medicinal plant natural biotechnology and integrative medicine as drivers for sustainable economic development and research excellence in WNC. Schmitt is an Adjunct Professor of Physiology and Pharmacology at Wake Forest University's School of Medicine and the Research Director for Bent Creek Institute in Asheville. These programs are free and open to the public; usual parking fees apply. Visit www.ncarboretum.org for more information, or call (828) 665-2492.

A pharmacist abandons her former profession and turns to the natural world:

My change of profession from pharmacy to complementary medicine happened in 1982 - the interest in nutritional and environmental medicine was in its infancy, so I've been part of its spectacular growth and expansion. I've seen the doubts from orthodox medicine fall away, its critics for the most part silenced and now see widespread embrace of integrative medicine. We've still got a long way to go, but eyes no longer glaze over when I talk about preconception healthcare.

That's the health trends daily wrap.